Y Is For The Question: Do You See The Two White Morning Glories?

Today the letter Y is for the question: do you see the two whitemorning glories? What things do you see when you look out the window? Do you see morning glories? This morning I spotted these two amazing white morning glories swaying in the wind, so I captured this moment in time.

Do you see the two white morning glories?
Do you see the two white morning glories?

In the video below you can actually see the petals of the white morning glories swaying in the wind. Southern California has many gusty days such as this one, and the morning glories handled the blustery weather quite well.

M Is For Méiguī Huā

Today the letter M is for méiguī huā, which is the Chinese word for rose. I spotted some roses on a bike ride the other day, and I wondered if there was word for rose in another language that started with M. Google told me that the Romanticized Chinese spelling of rose is méiguī huā, and in Chinese characters it is 玫瑰花.

The Romanticized word for rose is Méiguī.
The Romanticized Chinese word for rose is Méiguī.

Below is a video I made of a bee that was navigating his way around the roses.

F Is For Flowers

If you visit my blog often enough you will see that I frequently post pictures of flowers. Thus, today for the letter F I decided to share a few pictures of the floral beauty that I see during my daily adventures.

Daffodils are one of my favorite flowers because these are shiny yellow color, which reminds me of the sun.
Daffodils are one of my favorite flowers because these are shiny yellow hue, which reminds me of the sunshine.
Daffodils bow in the early morning sunlight.
Daffodils bow in the early morning sunlight.

Daffodils are one of my favorite flowers, which bloom in late February and early March here in Southern California.

In this video you can see Annie the cat frolicking among the spring flowers back in 2011.

A red hollyhock flower is a simple flower, but I love these planted in my container garden.
A red hollyhock flower is a simple flower, but I love these planted in my container garden.

Another one of my favorite flowers is the simple holly hock, and I planted one in my container garden last summer. Each morning new blooms opening on this plant.

How the Hyacinths Propagate

by Aya Katz, Guest Blogger

Long, long ago, I may have bought a hyacinth plant. I don’t remember, but I know they have bulbs. And I know what they look like, because I have seen the pictures. Yet this year a hyacinth bloomed in my front yard, and it was not true to type. It had only a few blossoms here and there, and there was not the canonical pattern of a tall tower of tiny flowers bursting from a single stem. That’s why I had trouble recognizing it, at first.

Hyacinth

Its lonely, sparse blossoms opened, and inside there was pollen. But who was the pollen for? Don’t hyacinths propagate through bulbs? And why were there no insects who wanted to come and partake of the feast? Could the wind be helping to spread whatever needs spreading? See how the pollen seems to scatter out of the bloom!

Hyacinth Closer

Propagating through bulbs is asexual, like cloning. But if pollen in turn leads to seed, then the new plant, once mature, won’t necessarily grow true to type. This hyacinth, I think, is not the one I bought. It is a love child of my former store-bought plant – related, but different. I like that thought.